It takes many to build the Web we want

Mozilla is announcing today the creation of a WebRTC competency center jointly with Telenor.

Mozilla’s purpose is to build the Web. We do so by building Firefox and Firefox OS. The Web is pretty unusual when it comes to interoperable technology stacks, because it is not built by standards bodies. Instead, the Web is built by browser vendors that implement browsers that implement the Web, which in the end pretty much defines what the Web is.

The Web adds new technologies whenever a majority of browser vendors agree to extend it in an interoperable way. Standards bodies merely help coordinating this process. Very rarely do new Web capabilities originate in a standards body. New Web capabilities merely end up there eventually, once there is sufficient interest by multiple browser vendors to warrant standardization.

Mozilla doesn’t — and can’t — build the Web alone. What makes the Web unique is that it is owned by no-one, and cannot be held back by anyone. It doesn’t take unanimous consent to extend the Web. A mere majority of browser vendors can popularize a new Web capability, forcing the rest of the browser vendors to eventually come along.

While several browser vendors build the Web, Mozilla has a unique vision for the Web that is driven by our mission as a non-profit foundation. Whereas all other browser vendors are for-profit corporations, advancing the Web in the interest of their shareholders, Mozilla advances the Web for users.

The primary browser vendors today are Google, Apple, Microsoft and Mozilla. These four organizations have a direct path to bring new technologies to the Web. While many other technology companies have a strong interest in the Web, they lack the ability to directly move the Web ahead because only these four browser vendors develop a rendering engine that implements the Web stack.

There is one more aspect that sets Mozilla apart from its browser vendor competitors. We are several orders of magnitude smaller than our peers. While this might appear as a market disadvantage at first, combined with our neutral and non-profit status it actually creates a unique opportunity. Many more technology companies have an interest in working on the Web, but if you aren’t Google, Apple, or Microsoft its very difficult to contribute core technologies to the Web. These three companies have direct control over a rendering engine. No other technology company can equally influence the Web. Mozilla is looking to change that.

Jointly with Telenor we are launching a new initiative that will allow parties with a strong technology interest in WebRTC to participate as an equal in the development process of the WebRTC standard. Since standards are really just a result of delivering new Web technologies in a rendering engine, Telenor will assign Telenor engineering staff to work on Mozilla’s implementation of WebRTC in Firefox and Firefox OS.

The goal of this new center is to implement WebRTC with a broad, neutral vision that captures the technology needs of many, not just the technology needs of individual browser vendors.

Mozilla is an open source project where every opinion and technical contribution matters. The WebRTC Competency Center will accelerate the development of WebRTC, and ensure that WebRTC serves the diverse technology interests of many. If you would like to see WebRTC (or any other part of the Web) grow capabilities that are important to you, join us.

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